Attention ! Fermeture imminente du forum d’Elektor (pour en savoir plus, cliquer ici). À partir du vendredi 15er mars il ne sera plus possible de s’identifier sur ce forum, mais son contenu restera disponible en lecture seule jusqu’à la fin du mois. Le 1er avril, il sera fermé définitivement.

Schéma de JC. Morisson

Les deux livres de Francis Ibre : <a href="http://www.elektor.fr/nos" target=_blank><U>Tubes audio anciens & récents</U> (2007)</a> et <a href="http://www.elektor.fr/audiotubes" target=_blank><U>Audio tubes </U> (2010)</a>

Re: Schéma de JC. Morisson

Postby guytou » Thu Jan 17, 2019 9:53 pm

Merci Thierry , j'avais pas fait le lien !
On a le droit d'etre mauvais , mais on a le devoir de s'améliorer ( Guytou , 1990 aprés JC ) .
Chacun a raison de son propre point de vue, mais il n'est pas impossible que tout le monde ait tort ( Gandhi )
guytou
 
Posts: 1270
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2015 6:00 pm

Re: Schéma de JC. Morisson

Postby yves07 » Thu Jan 17, 2019 11:03 pm

Très beau bouquin à télécharger et à poser sur sa table de nuit :mrgreen:

Merci Thierry !
yves07
 
Posts: 988
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 7:54 am
Location: Ardèche

Re: Schéma de JC. Morisson

Postby tboll » Fri Jan 18, 2019 10:48 am

Bonjour Yves, bonjour à tous,

Il faut une table de nuit solide avec cet handbook de 1050 pages. Il faut avoir aussi de grosses insomnies pour en venir à bout.

En effet, dans la préface, les auteurs annoncent 1 100 figures et schémas et surtout plus de 1 400 équations.

J'ai commencé à le survoler, il faut de bonnes bases en électroniques et en mathématiques.

Par exemple, la section 3 sur les amplificateurs de tension semble très intéressante et assez détaillée avec 86 pages sur ce seul sujet.

En revanche, la section 4 (assez courte, 39) sur les amplificateur de puissance "règle" le cas des monotriode en moins de 10 pages .... Je suis "étonné"...

Les radio-amateurs auront aussi de quoi se faire plaisir.

Bonne lecture et bonne journée.

Thierry
VOT-HP 416-8B GPA Altec Lansing Alnico - Pavillon Iwata-compression ALTEC 909-8A - Tweeter Fostex T925 - CD Marantz 6002 - préamplificateur 76/6SN7 (Sound Practices)-2 blocs 300B- schéma-Audiophile -
SE 845 en projet
User avatar
tboll
 
Posts: 1913
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 7:55 am
Location: Chartreuse

Re: Schéma de JC. Morisson

Postby trappeur » Fri Jan 18, 2019 11:31 am

Salut à tous,
tboll wrote:En revanche, la section 4 (assez courte, 39) sur les amplificateur de puissance "règle" le cas des monotriode en moins de 10 pages .... Je suis "étonné"...


Ben oui , les monotriodes sont une mode récente !!
En 1957 , elles étaient à leurs juste place , 10 pages c'est bien déjà :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

A+
trappeur
 
Posts: 301
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 7:56 am

Re: Schéma de JC. Morisson

Postby guytou » Fri Jan 18, 2019 11:38 am

Bonjour à tous , j'ai reçu quelques informations complémentaires , concernant notamment le DA-100 , de monsieur Morrison itself . Les voici :

" i will try to keep my replies simple. my blog is perhaps not so easy for translation... it is very urban and very street, as i am, as well as technical. but i don't think that engineering and culture should ever be separated. otherwise engineers often make nightmares at the same time. so it is my responsibility to keep them together in an obvious way. there is no such thing as "objective" engineering. never was.

i have been interested in the DC coupling of amplifier and filter stages for many years. it is a kind of puzzle that i like... it is different from the modular block design that is most popular with more traditional engineers... but it can produce a kind of more compact elegance, with an optimized result for a particular job.

the "bootstrap" circuit isn't new. but it has opportunities for DC coupling that are both simpler and yet just as effective for joining stages, as the more traditional "stacking" approach. "bootstrap" comes from an old english expression for lifting yourself up into the air by your own "bootstraps"... clearly a fantasy cowboy idea. successful business people often talk about themselves with this concept. bootstrap circuits "fly" with a signal... which means they are by nature "floating". and in the case of the DA-100 circuit, the cathode is flying about at near mu gain. solid state amplifiers often use the technique to increase the apparent impedance of a part of a circuit without using large value resistors or inductors. this can be useful for stabilizing a load or a bias.

this does have some penalty for the cathode. there's is a maximum rating for heater to cathode difference voltage. the heater must have a fixed relationship to AC ground. 90 - 100 volts is often the edge of damage to the cathode coating for an indirectly heated tube. the field strength can change the electrical chemistry of the heart of any tube. this is always an issue with DC coupled circuits where the cathodes sit and different levels. dual tubes are not well suited for this circuit. in a preamp or a normal receiving type tube, this is no issue. the signal voltages are small. but a transmitting tube driver stage is different. we are trying to swing +/- 180 volts.

the 3 stage DC amp has always been a challenge, because the components (tubes) change with time or capricious human nature (the idiocy of "tube rolling"). i have spent a good deal of time on just this puzzle, and hope i have contributed to the discipline. this amp was one of my solutions, and it is a stable design.

by referencing the plate of the first triode to ground (the common electrical connection) instead of the cathode, the variation in plate resistance from the signal forces the cathode to fly instead of the plate, IF IT CAN. a coupling transformer allows this to happen. because the secondary isn't connected to the source's relationship with ground. it isn't the only way, but is the most simple way.

because ground is shorted through the power supply to B- , the constant current source is no different from it's position in a grounded cathode circuit. but the compliance at the cathode will be forced to vary at a rate nearly equal to triode mu. full gain. however, level shifting the signal to the next stage, which must be fixed with respect to B- in the normal way, becomes easily adjustable with a simple resistor. select simply for the drop needed to correctly bias the next stage. the impedance of the constant current source will be many many times the value of any practical resistor. you lose very little signal. in my actual circuit i lost 0.5dB with a 10K resistor. the first two stages are now locked into place by their bias, between ground and a fixed current. an excellent arrangement with long term stability. moving to the third stage, ordinarily difficult, isn't anymore. because the plate of the 2nd triode is also referenced to ground, but by a short distance, it is extremely uneventful to DC couple to the output stage, with some, or all, of the negative bias needed. if more is needed, one stacked stage referenced to ground is all that is necessary for stability.

the power supply is always an issue with transmitting tubes. above 600 volts, a shock through the body to ground will always involve injury. for DC it is mainly burns and muscle injuries. with AC it is a coffin more than half the time. of course the power supply is part of the circuit... and in this circuit you see my own thinking about this. it may not agree with you? but it only has to agree with me, and the one who chooses to buy it.

i like choke input supplies because there is some regulation. i like regulated supplies, a lot. but at 1000 volts it's a bit complicated. i have done active circuits for tube testers that regulated 880 volts at 300mA. that is for testing at 450 - 600 volts. i used cascoded triode connected 6550s as the pass elements, which are MUCH more reliable in that application than any MOSFET. the unregulated supply is 1500 volts of choke input power.

i tell you this because mounting a choke with 1500 volts in it to a chassis is not trivial. it is much better to put the choke in the ground circuit where it functions exactly the same, with only the forward voltage across it. i have personally experienced the failures and also the electrocution in repairing that equipment. which was used to test about 8 million vacuum tubes from 1997 to 2008.

the worst injury i have had in my career was a regulated shock between my elbow and finger. the burn reached far inside.

so i am maybe a bit more safety conscious than some.

also, it isn't at all necessary for the choke to sit on the DC side. an AC choke input needs FAR less inductance to get the same amount of regulation and filtering, than a DC choke. also, you need no gap in an AC choke, so you can use an ordinary power transformer for a choke in many cases... the critical inductance is harder to pick with AC, so just make it a bit too much. in that case 2H worked the same as 10H on the DC side. but much smaller and no buzz. you do drop quite a bit... but it is a choke input filter. inrush current is slowed down, and if the current increases, the DC voltage rises!

also, i really don't like oil caps. hate them. i hate it when they blow up and they are too big and don't sound good. i like many many small electrolytics in parallel. or big film caps with no oil in them... made for electrical transmission or radar. and i bypass at the tube with a small film cap. you may not agree. i don't care. these are my amps.


i like tube rectifiers but they add impedance. they are soft recovery and don't store a back charge. they can't! they can have a slow turn on, which is great, but not the indirectly heated rectifiers... they are on fast. tv tubes are nice and slow. but tube bridges are big and inefficient. i use tv damper diodes myself. but high end audiophiles can't handle weird tubes. especially in the billionaire class of customer. i was forced to have GZ34s and 6X4s by the business, not by sound or performance. i have no use for those. but that's just how it is.

they are at least as good as WE274s. hahahahah!

and that is pretty much it for that amp "


Si ça aide quelqu'un , je peux essayer de traduire .
On a le droit d'etre mauvais , mais on a le devoir de s'améliorer ( Guytou , 1990 aprés JC ) .
Chacun a raison de son propre point de vue, mais il n'est pas impossible que tout le monde ait tort ( Gandhi )
guytou
 
Posts: 1270
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2015 6:00 pm

Re: Schéma de JC. Morisson

Postby g2fl » Fri Jan 18, 2019 1:31 pm

Bonjour,
de bonnes descriptions, explicationsi et, surtout, mesures étaient dans...notre ouvrage (humour!).
g2fl
 
Posts: 231
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 7:57 am

Re: Schéma de JC. Morisson

Postby guytou » Fri Jan 18, 2019 2:30 pm

Bonjour Gérards , je l'acheterais bien votre livre , il est toujours disponible ?

Merci d'avance .
On a le droit d'etre mauvais , mais on a le devoir de s'améliorer ( Guytou , 1990 aprés JC ) .
Chacun a raison de son propre point de vue, mais il n'est pas impossible que tout le monde ait tort ( Gandhi )
guytou
 
Posts: 1270
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2015 6:00 pm

Re: Schéma de JC. Morisson

Postby tboll » Fri Jan 18, 2019 9:35 pm

Bonsoir à tous,

@Trappeur. Oui, 10 pages, c'est vraiment très peu pour s'initier aux multiples subtilités et finesses des montages monotriodes...

En revanche, ce qui m'étonne le plus, c'est d'avoir besoin de 29 pages pour présenter les différentes sortes de Push-pull qui au final se ressemblent toutes.
Surtout qu'au final le meilleur Push-pull à tubes arrive péniblement au niveau d'un simple amplificateur à transistors acheté chez Darty....
Heureusement que les ingénieurs en audio ont fait des progrès depuis 1957.
On peut quand même reconnaître le mérite aux auteurs d'avoir exposé pendant 86 pages dans la section 3, l'amplification en classe A. C'est bien le minimum...

Bon, on pourrait lancer un long débat sur les multiples avantages des montages monotriode et les non moins très nombreux inconvénients des PP mais c'est inutile, les adeptes des PP sont de mauvaise foi...
Merci de ne pas répondre sur ce point sauf si vous êtes adepte de mauvaise foi des montages monotriode...

@guytou.
Merci, pour le texte de Morrison, il permet de mieux comprendre son amplificateur. Cela dit je serai bien incapable de comprendre les subtilités de cet amplificateur monotriode...
Sérieusement, passer de ce texte certes très intéressant à comprendre réellement son schéma, j'en suis loin.

Thierry
VOT-HP 416-8B GPA Altec Lansing Alnico - Pavillon Iwata-compression ALTEC 909-8A - Tweeter Fostex T925 - CD Marantz 6002 - préamplificateur 76/6SN7 (Sound Practices)-2 blocs 300B- schéma-Audiophile -
SE 845 en projet
User avatar
tboll
 
Posts: 1913
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 7:55 am
Location: Chartreuse

Re: Schéma de JC. Morisson

Postby trappeur » Fri Jan 18, 2019 10:27 pm

Salut Thierry ,

tboll wrote:Merci de ne pas répondre sur ce point sauf si vous êtes adepte de mauvaise foi des montages monotriode...


Je suis effectivement de mauvaise foi dans tous les cas , donc parfaitement qualifié pour répondre 8-)

tboll wrote:Surtout qu'au final le meilleur Push-pull à tubes arrive péniblement au niveau d'un simple amplificateur à transistors acheté chez Darty....


Là par contre je dois dire que mon frigo ne fait pas de musique :shock:

tboll wrote:En revanche, ce qui m'étonne le plus, c'est d'avoir besoin de 29 pages pour présenter les différentes sortes de Push-pull qui au final se ressemblent toutes.


J'en connais même qui passent 30 pages ...sur le même PP :o

tboll wrote:Heureusement que les ingénieurs en audio ont fait des progrès depuis 1957.


Sérieusement pas tellement, il a fallu attendre le 21ème siècle pour faire aussi bien que ce qu'on faisait vers le milieu des années cinquante.
Il faudrait tout de même que tu écoutes une fois dans ta vie un Mc Intosch de cette époque sur des enceintes un peu conséquente comme les "voix du théatre" ou les "Brigantins" de chez Cabasse qui allaient très bien aussi.
Ecoutes donc aussi les rééditions CD ou SACD des enregistrements des années cinquante de chez MERCURY , la série LIVING PRESENCE , ça donne une idée de ce qu'étaient les ingé son de cette époque et de ce quon pouvait faire avec une chaîne de production entièrement à tube.
Mais les ingénieurs en question avaient des excuses , d'abord l'image a pris le pas sur le son à partir du milieu des années 70 et on n'a plus rien fait de propre en audio , ensuite le numérique est arrivé et on a pris le temps de s'en remettre (l'image y a beaucoup gagné , le son un peu moins , mis à part les supports qui sont moins fragiles)
Mais depuis les semi conducteurs qui manquaient sont enfin arrivés et on a rattrapé le retard qu'on avait sur les ingénieurs des années cinquante.

tboll wrote:Sérieusement, passer de ce texte certes très intéressant à comprendre réellement son schéma, j'en suis loin.


Ben c'est un "HandBook" , ça donne des recettes , des tableaux et des formules mais ça explique très peu .
Il existe d'autres bouquins qui expliquent beaucoup plus , dans les publications Elektor par exemple..

Maintenant si tu veux vraiment franchir un gap sans te ruiner , interresses toi un peu à la Cdiff , le brevet date des années cinquante lui aussi , par contre sa mise en oeuvre en audio n'est toujours pas faite , sauf en DIY
A+.
trappeur
 
Posts: 301
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 7:56 am

Re: Schéma de JC. Morisson

Postby guytou » Fri Jan 18, 2019 11:36 pm

" écoute donc les rééditions CD ou SACD des enregistrements des années cinquante de chez MERCURY , la série LIVING PRESENCE , ça donne une idée de ce qu'étaient les ingé son de cette époque et de ce qu'on pouvait faire avec une chaîne de production entièrement à tubes. " .

Ah oui , ça c'est bien vrai ! Plus un ,comme on dit .
On a le droit d'etre mauvais , mais on a le devoir de s'améliorer ( Guytou , 1990 aprés JC ) .
Chacun a raison de son propre point de vue, mais il n'est pas impossible que tout le monde ait tort ( Gandhi )
guytou
 
Posts: 1270
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2015 6:00 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Tubes audio

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: shucondo and 3 guests